Penumbra, step 1
Penumbra, step 1

Mansourkhani Roya and Caulfield Derek

 Penumbra is a nonfigural geometric structure similar to Persian patterns of masculinity. Decorated with the attempt of justice and burnt out with persecution. The steel form radiates an attitude of dominance. As a symbol of righteousness, the bursting form collapses and chokes, wounding itself with intolerance. This façade of false truths leaves a tide of shade, masking prosperity.

Penumbra, step 2
Penumbra, step 2

Mansourkhani Roya and Caulfield Derek

Penumbra, step 3
Penumbra, step 3

Mansourkhani Roya, Caulfield Derek

Ms. Interpretation
Ms. Interpretation

Mansourkhani Roya

            I have used the Persian architecture, designed by Derek Caulfield, and I have cast the shadow of the statue to show the symbol of Muslim women. In this piece I have drawn these shadows as words. These shadows can no longer be hidden and silent.  As they accumulate they turn from whisper to scream, and, therefore, no one can any longer ignore these screams. These written words are inspired by Shahnameh Ferdosi, that describes the life of a woman named Tahmineh; a woman so beautiful, so intelligent and so strong who chooses her own man, walks into his room and asks for a child. She then chooses to raise his son by her own strong self and with that she built a strong man who later becomes one of the Persians biggest heroes in Iranian myth. These shadows next to Edgar Lopez’s painting then changes to screams of feminist poem inspired by Forough Farokhzad and next to Heather Mawson’s artwork it then changes to paraphrases stating, “I can no longer remain silent”. So now these shadows have grown so much that silent can no longer prison them.   

Ms. interpretation
Ms. interpretation

Mansourkhani Roya

Reconstructing Dialogue
Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

With verbal and visual interaction, Roya and I developed a piece that embodies transformation through process and physical means. Veiling became a topic of conversation in the beginning of our collaboration. I wanted to portray two types of veiling: the veil that individuals place upon themselves and the veil that others place upon them. I used layers of wax to represent physical and metaphorical veils that are worn. The stitching illustrates how individual personalities are pieced together. Roya explained that: in the Middle East a candle is a sign of enlightenment, veiling is optional in western society, and that westerners have an option to wear a veil.  While in Iran, however, women are forced to wear veils.  Punishment will be inflicted to them and possibly their family if they refuse to veil. The piece was developed and transformed by conversation and material manipulation.  Reconstructing Dialogue portrays the resilience of women. Although Muslim women face opposition they refuse to remain quiet.  Women continue to rebuild themselves by speaking out about the atrocities placed upon them. 

Reconstructing Dialogue
Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

step 2.

Reconstructing Dialogue
Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

Step 3

Reconstructing Dialogue
Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

step 4

The Caged Bird Flies, Step1
The Caged Bird Flies, Step1

Mansourkhani  Roya  & Lopez  Edgar

When I would think of a Muslim woman, I pictured a veiled goddess with a heart for love and the natural desire for freedom. My idea of her was the same as I have for any other woman, and that is that women, to me, are nature’s most beautiful creations. Because I didn’t know the significance of the veil in Islamic culture, I depicted her face as having a sort of blurred effect with only her eyes to show. Although this blurred “mask” conceals her identity, she remains a sexy woman, which is how I feel about women in Islamic culture. I did, however, know that often time’s women were stoned as a form of punishment for reasons I wasn’t sure of. The woman I initially created represented every spirit that opposed such oppression with the stone in her grasp to take back that power.

Roya broke down all of the uncertainties I had in the initial idea of the piece, which began to solidify the identity of the woman we were creating. Women wear veils which are meant to prevent them from projecting any sort of attraction that would tempt a man. Intimacy before marriage is strictly forbidden for women, even if it is against their consent, and in doing is punishable by public stoning. Sexuality is a biological human characteristic, and to be restricted of such pleasure is to take away the only thing that makes this world an amazing place-love.

As Roya came back with her response, she adorned the figure with symbols of Sufism and Farsi writing. But what really made an impression on me was the incorporated poetry of Forough Farrokhzad. Forough was an Iranian poet who was quite controversial in her expressions of being a female in Islamic culture, which was ideal in connecting my idea to factual examples. Being a woman in that culture is to be denied of the most natural and beautiful of human affections, and Forough compares that type of soul to that of a caged bird. I loved the metaphor-thus the depiction of a bird to represent her soul as an un-masked and completely free spirit against the parasitic-like/mechanical creatures that seem to be sucking the color out of the woman. 

The Caged Bird Flies, step 2
The Caged Bird Flies, step 2

Mansourkhani  Roya  & Lopez  Edgar

The Caged Bird Flies, step 3
The Caged Bird Flies, step 3

Edgar Lopez & Roya Mansourkhani

The Caged Bird Flies, step4
The Caged Bird Flies, step4

Edgar Lopez & Roya Mansourkhani

Survivor of the Struggle, step 1
Survivor of the Struggle, step 1

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

Mixed Media- Acrylic paint, oil pastels, glass bowls, Styrofoam, fabric, findings, plastic flowers, coffee beans, pins, empty bullet cartridges, bling I choose to do this piece to help bring awareness to the plight of women who struggle to find their voice under the tyranny of cultural, religious, financial and patriarchal abuse that has been put upon women for generations. As I began to gather the materials for this piece I realized that I was healing my own brokenness from the past. In the first segment of the piece I placed broken pieces of plates as the broken shards of pain situated in a desert environment upon which sat a women’s head seated on the rocks that are used to beat women in Arab countries.

Roya’s response was to put the broken shards back together again and reshape the shards into a bowl representing the fact that we will never be perfect but we can heal our lives. The rocks were painted in gold, and painted the desert like a prayer rug design.

To her response I put flowers on the head, painted the  ‘prayer rug ‘ blue to signify the spiritual waters of healing, placed empty bullet cartridges into the shape of a flower, and decorated the women’s head with coffee beans to signify hospitality rather than hostility.Roya’s response was to place pins all over the piece to indicate that beauty does not always need to look beautiful, burned the flowers and scattered them over the piece. This is indicative that women in Arab countries are still punished despite their outward beauty.My response was to bring this struggle to a higher level of consciousness by ‘baptizing’ the piece With more white paint.

 

Survivor of the Struggle, step 2
Survivor of the Struggle, step 2

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

Survivor of the Struggle, step 3
Survivor of the Struggle, step 3

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

Survivor of the Struggle, step 4
Survivor of the Struggle, step 4

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

 Freedom
Freedom

Mansourkhani Roya and S.N

This piece of art shows the process of body language which came from a woman who felt insecure in her whole life and surrounded with fears, self-censorship, judgment and criticism. But when your heart is free, you are no longer afraid to do the things it was built to do. You make your mind and body free from all the negative eyes who are watching you with criticizes and start a new chapter of your life by closing all the doors to the past and open doors to the new life, love and grow. In first figures you can see the weaknesses, fear in her gestures. Ripped covers and Discontinues in her words and she doesn’t know what she wants for herself anymore. Not knowing what you want anymore, feels like not knowing who you are as well as feeling as if you've lost yourself. But step by step as you can see in the bottom-left figure of her, she came out from this darkness and tried to find the liberty in her mind, speech and her body. Roya responded to my work with Persian typography which is a poem by “Simin Behbahani” an Iranian poet who is known for her social activism and her concerns for issues such as justice, women’s rights, and freedom of speech. In this poem, she talks about bareness and covering. By this poem, Roya tried to demonstrate the consistency of the word and freedom of speech. Roya believes that this woman is not afraid of anything anymore and she knows her right.

Freedom, step 2
Freedom, step 2

Mansourkhani Roya and S.N

1
1

Mansourkhani Roya and Morales Jose

With the use of color and abstraction I am showing my opinion of Muslim women. Typically, I begin my work by sketching ideas and staring on the surface to develop my composition. I used black acrylic to show the perseverance and strength of Muslim women. The use of the blue does not represent sadness, but shows the joy of what they have overcame so far. The abstracted woman figure in a Chador, is placed close to the edge of the paper to show movement forward. Behind her is the color green that indicates life and the growing effort of their fight. Also the green is placed behind the figure to further show how they are leaving behind something better for the future generation. I used red to show bravery, blood and sacrifice. The red color is placed in front of her to demonstrate how far women are willing to go. Finally the eye in the background is there to remind us all of two things. Which are not to ignore what is happening and that there is a person behind the veil who needs equal treatment and respect.

2
2

Mansourkhani Roya and Morales Jose

3
3

Mansourkhani Roya and Morales Jose

 Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria   This drawing made me realize that I do not know much about a Muslim woman and/or Muslim culture. The only information I do have is the information I read in newspapers or magazines or see on TV. The media gives us general information about national current events but we are given only minimal information. The drawing depicts newspaper text as overwhelming. The silhouettes at the bottom can depict the general public or the male figure. On the right side, I decided to portray the female figure and her family as being "steeped" in that culture. The left side depicts the female's desire to have a better education for her and her family. The center figure is very mysterious to us yet it has so much to tell us, we just need to try to understand what it represents by maybe learning more about the language. This is why it is filled with letters.Maria Moreno

Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria 

This drawing made me realize that I do not know much about a Muslim woman and/or Muslim culture. The only information I do have is the information I read in newspapers or magazines or see on TV. The media gives us general information about national current events but we are given only minimal information. The drawing depicts newspaper text as overwhelming. The silhouettes at the bottom can depict the general public or the male figure. On the right side, I decided to portray the female figure and her family as being "steeped" in that culture. The left side depicts the female's desire to have a better education for her and her family. The center figure is very mysterious to us yet it has so much to tell us, we just need to try to understand what it represents by maybe learning more about the language. This is why it is filled with letters.Maria Moreno

2
2

Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria 

3
3

Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria 

Ignorance
Ignorance

Mansourkhani Roya and Sanchez Jr. Harry 

 

What I am doing with the Muslim woman project is based on satire, stereotypes, and ignorance of the western world and their view of Muslim woman based on the media and their portrayal of them. To me much of what people think is based on what they see on TV or on social media without the desire to go any deeper to look for what is behind the veil so to say.Harry Sanchez Jr.

Ignorance
Ignorance

Mansourkhani Roya and Sanchez Jr. Harry 

Ignorance 2
Ignorance 2
Ignorance 3
Ignorance 3
Ignorance 4
Ignorance 4
Unified Under Five
Unified Under Five

Mansourkhani Roya and Martinez Paola

The commence of this intriguing conversation began with an oil piece titled, “Wedding Preparations.” In this piece a young Muslim is preparing herself for her arranged marriage. The artist invites the viewer to place themselves into the lives of these women. Where the right to love whom you wish is taken away from you. You may no longer feel. You may no longer dwell on love or the opportunity to be happy. You may no longer love.

The response Roya Mansourkhani brought forth was in addition, a glimpse of the change Muslim women go through when they are married. They are now blinded to the rights they were given at birth and are forced to fall silent. Losing their opinion and their voice, women fall into a chain that has been carried through generations.

In agreement Paola Martinez observed the painting, and saw Strong Women. Women whom yes, may lose their voice, but fight generation through generation to survive. Almost like that of an animalistic instinct of a tiger fighting until the end. This instinctual survival is something that is passed from mother to daughter through generations.

Mansourkhani responded that if women would only use The Five Pillars of Islam to their favor they would become much stronger!

In agreement Martinez added four more hands to equal The Five Islamic Pillars, each as a strong individual and added them in unity to symbolize how united women are able to change and bring peace to the generational Line.

The conversation is ended with this piece, “Unified Under Five.”    

IMG_0203.jpg
SAM_2704.jpg
SAM_2790.jpg
SAM_2890.jpg
DSC_0259.jpg
Hanging by a Thread
Hanging by a Thread

 

 Mansourkhani  Roya and Ramirez Jeanette 

When I began with this collaboration, my knowledge on the subject was limited. Working with what little I knew, my instinctive thoughts and feelings became the vehicle for my portion of the piece.The initial conversation with Roya Mansourkhani, started by me describing the Muslim women as mysterious and obscure. I portrayed these qualities by manipulating black fabric, where the finished product was a hanging body of fabric, frozen in movement and textures.Roya responded back by explaining how strong the male presence is in this culture, she talks about the restraints women have by adding a knot-like fabric to the work. Roya also shows the delicate presence Muslim women have in their culture, by casting her face that only shows nose, mouth and chin, she also casts her hand in representation of strength.I finalized the conversation by agreeing to the inevitable male presence for Muslim women, but yet I enhanced the strength of the Muslim women by representing her as the backbone. A strong entity that strives from injustice and continues on. I used the “insides” of the male subjects that Roya had constructed before as a fuller flowing body, giving it a wider aesthetic and stronger meaning of a Muslim women. One fabric in particular is thicker and longer from the others, representing the backbone. I added the knot-like fabric as a gruesome representation of the reality for Muslim women, a reality they’re trying to change day by day.

SAM_2715.jpg
DSC_0246.jpg
Penumbra, step 1
Penumbra, step 2
Penumbra, step 3
Ms. Interpretation
Ms. interpretation
Reconstructing Dialogue
Reconstructing Dialogue
Reconstructing Dialogue
Reconstructing Dialogue
The Caged Bird Flies, Step1
The Caged Bird Flies, step 2
The Caged Bird Flies, step 3
The Caged Bird Flies, step4
Survivor of the Struggle, step 1
Survivor of the Struggle, step 2
Survivor of the Struggle, step 3
Survivor of the Struggle, step 4
 Freedom
Freedom, step 2
1
2
3
 Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria   This drawing made me realize that I do not know much about a Muslim woman and/or Muslim culture. The only information I do have is the information I read in newspapers or magazines or see on TV. The media gives us general information about national current events but we are given only minimal information. The drawing depicts newspaper text as overwhelming. The silhouettes at the bottom can depict the general public or the male figure. On the right side, I decided to portray the female figure and her family as being "steeped" in that culture. The left side depicts the female's desire to have a better education for her and her family. The center figure is very mysterious to us yet it has so much to tell us, we just need to try to understand what it represents by maybe learning more about the language. This is why it is filled with letters.Maria Moreno
2
3
Ignorance
Ignorance
Ignorance 2
Ignorance 3
Ignorance 4
Unified Under Five
IMG_0203.jpg
SAM_2704.jpg
SAM_2790.jpg
SAM_2890.jpg
DSC_0259.jpg
Hanging by a Thread
SAM_2715.jpg
DSC_0246.jpg
Penumbra, step 1

Mansourkhani Roya and Caulfield Derek

 Penumbra is a nonfigural geometric structure similar to Persian patterns of masculinity. Decorated with the attempt of justice and burnt out with persecution. The steel form radiates an attitude of dominance. As a symbol of righteousness, the bursting form collapses and chokes, wounding itself with intolerance. This façade of false truths leaves a tide of shade, masking prosperity.

Penumbra, step 2

Mansourkhani Roya and Caulfield Derek

Penumbra, step 3

Mansourkhani Roya, Caulfield Derek

Ms. Interpretation

Mansourkhani Roya

            I have used the Persian architecture, designed by Derek Caulfield, and I have cast the shadow of the statue to show the symbol of Muslim women. In this piece I have drawn these shadows as words. These shadows can no longer be hidden and silent.  As they accumulate they turn from whisper to scream, and, therefore, no one can any longer ignore these screams. These written words are inspired by Shahnameh Ferdosi, that describes the life of a woman named Tahmineh; a woman so beautiful, so intelligent and so strong who chooses her own man, walks into his room and asks for a child. She then chooses to raise his son by her own strong self and with that she built a strong man who later becomes one of the Persians biggest heroes in Iranian myth. These shadows next to Edgar Lopez’s painting then changes to screams of feminist poem inspired by Forough Farokhzad and next to Heather Mawson’s artwork it then changes to paraphrases stating, “I can no longer remain silent”. So now these shadows have grown so much that silent can no longer prison them.   

Ms. interpretation

Mansourkhani Roya

Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

With verbal and visual interaction, Roya and I developed a piece that embodies transformation through process and physical means. Veiling became a topic of conversation in the beginning of our collaboration. I wanted to portray two types of veiling: the veil that individuals place upon themselves and the veil that others place upon them. I used layers of wax to represent physical and metaphorical veils that are worn. The stitching illustrates how individual personalities are pieced together. Roya explained that: in the Middle East a candle is a sign of enlightenment, veiling is optional in western society, and that westerners have an option to wear a veil.  While in Iran, however, women are forced to wear veils.  Punishment will be inflicted to them and possibly their family if they refuse to veil. The piece was developed and transformed by conversation and material manipulation.  Reconstructing Dialogue portrays the resilience of women. Although Muslim women face opposition they refuse to remain quiet.  Women continue to rebuild themselves by speaking out about the atrocities placed upon them. 

Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

step 2.

Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

Step 3

Reconstructing Dialogue

 Mansourkhani Roya, Mawson Heather 

step 4

The Caged Bird Flies, Step1

Mansourkhani  Roya  & Lopez  Edgar

When I would think of a Muslim woman, I pictured a veiled goddess with a heart for love and the natural desire for freedom. My idea of her was the same as I have for any other woman, and that is that women, to me, are nature’s most beautiful creations. Because I didn’t know the significance of the veil in Islamic culture, I depicted her face as having a sort of blurred effect with only her eyes to show. Although this blurred “mask” conceals her identity, she remains a sexy woman, which is how I feel about women in Islamic culture. I did, however, know that often time’s women were stoned as a form of punishment for reasons I wasn’t sure of. The woman I initially created represented every spirit that opposed such oppression with the stone in her grasp to take back that power.

Roya broke down all of the uncertainties I had in the initial idea of the piece, which began to solidify the identity of the woman we were creating. Women wear veils which are meant to prevent them from projecting any sort of attraction that would tempt a man. Intimacy before marriage is strictly forbidden for women, even if it is against their consent, and in doing is punishable by public stoning. Sexuality is a biological human characteristic, and to be restricted of such pleasure is to take away the only thing that makes this world an amazing place-love.

As Roya came back with her response, she adorned the figure with symbols of Sufism and Farsi writing. But what really made an impression on me was the incorporated poetry of Forough Farrokhzad. Forough was an Iranian poet who was quite controversial in her expressions of being a female in Islamic culture, which was ideal in connecting my idea to factual examples. Being a woman in that culture is to be denied of the most natural and beautiful of human affections, and Forough compares that type of soul to that of a caged bird. I loved the metaphor-thus the depiction of a bird to represent her soul as an un-masked and completely free spirit against the parasitic-like/mechanical creatures that seem to be sucking the color out of the woman. 

The Caged Bird Flies, step 2

Mansourkhani  Roya  & Lopez  Edgar

The Caged Bird Flies, step 3

Edgar Lopez & Roya Mansourkhani

The Caged Bird Flies, step4

Edgar Lopez & Roya Mansourkhani

Survivor of the Struggle, step 1

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

Mixed Media- Acrylic paint, oil pastels, glass bowls, Styrofoam, fabric, findings, plastic flowers, coffee beans, pins, empty bullet cartridges, bling I choose to do this piece to help bring awareness to the plight of women who struggle to find their voice under the tyranny of cultural, religious, financial and patriarchal abuse that has been put upon women for generations. As I began to gather the materials for this piece I realized that I was healing my own brokenness from the past. In the first segment of the piece I placed broken pieces of plates as the broken shards of pain situated in a desert environment upon which sat a women’s head seated on the rocks that are used to beat women in Arab countries.

Roya’s response was to put the broken shards back together again and reshape the shards into a bowl representing the fact that we will never be perfect but we can heal our lives. The rocks were painted in gold, and painted the desert like a prayer rug design.

To her response I put flowers on the head, painted the  ‘prayer rug ‘ blue to signify the spiritual waters of healing, placed empty bullet cartridges into the shape of a flower, and decorated the women’s head with coffee beans to signify hospitality rather than hostility.Roya’s response was to place pins all over the piece to indicate that beauty does not always need to look beautiful, burned the flowers and scattered them over the piece. This is indicative that women in Arab countries are still punished despite their outward beauty.My response was to bring this struggle to a higher level of consciousness by ‘baptizing’ the piece With more white paint.

 

Survivor of the Struggle, step 2

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

Survivor of the Struggle, step 3

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

Survivor of the Struggle, step 4

Mansourkhani Roya, Navar Carmen

Freedom

Mansourkhani Roya and S.N

This piece of art shows the process of body language which came from a woman who felt insecure in her whole life and surrounded with fears, self-censorship, judgment and criticism. But when your heart is free, you are no longer afraid to do the things it was built to do. You make your mind and body free from all the negative eyes who are watching you with criticizes and start a new chapter of your life by closing all the doors to the past and open doors to the new life, love and grow. In first figures you can see the weaknesses, fear in her gestures. Ripped covers and Discontinues in her words and she doesn’t know what she wants for herself anymore. Not knowing what you want anymore, feels like not knowing who you are as well as feeling as if you've lost yourself. But step by step as you can see in the bottom-left figure of her, she came out from this darkness and tried to find the liberty in her mind, speech and her body. Roya responded to my work with Persian typography which is a poem by “Simin Behbahani” an Iranian poet who is known for her social activism and her concerns for issues such as justice, women’s rights, and freedom of speech. In this poem, she talks about bareness and covering. By this poem, Roya tried to demonstrate the consistency of the word and freedom of speech. Roya believes that this woman is not afraid of anything anymore and she knows her right.

Freedom, step 2

Mansourkhani Roya and S.N

1

Mansourkhani Roya and Morales Jose

With the use of color and abstraction I am showing my opinion of Muslim women. Typically, I begin my work by sketching ideas and staring on the surface to develop my composition. I used black acrylic to show the perseverance and strength of Muslim women. The use of the blue does not represent sadness, but shows the joy of what they have overcame so far. The abstracted woman figure in a Chador, is placed close to the edge of the paper to show movement forward. Behind her is the color green that indicates life and the growing effort of their fight. Also the green is placed behind the figure to further show how they are leaving behind something better for the future generation. I used red to show bravery, blood and sacrifice. The red color is placed in front of her to demonstrate how far women are willing to go. Finally the eye in the background is there to remind us all of two things. Which are not to ignore what is happening and that there is a person behind the veil who needs equal treatment and respect.

2

Mansourkhani Roya and Morales Jose

3

Mansourkhani Roya and Morales Jose

Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria 

This drawing made me realize that I do not know much about a Muslim woman and/or Muslim culture. The only information I do have is the information I read in newspapers or magazines or see on TV. The media gives us general information about national current events but we are given only minimal information. The drawing depicts newspaper text as overwhelming. The silhouettes at the bottom can depict the general public or the male figure. On the right side, I decided to portray the female figure and her family as being "steeped" in that culture. The left side depicts the female's desire to have a better education for her and her family. The center figure is very mysterious to us yet it has so much to tell us, we just need to try to understand what it represents by maybe learning more about the language. This is why it is filled with letters.Maria Moreno

2

Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria 

3

Mansourkhani Roya, Moreno Maria 

Ignorance

Mansourkhani Roya and Sanchez Jr. Harry 

 

What I am doing with the Muslim woman project is based on satire, stereotypes, and ignorance of the western world and their view of Muslim woman based on the media and their portrayal of them. To me much of what people think is based on what they see on TV or on social media without the desire to go any deeper to look for what is behind the veil so to say.Harry Sanchez Jr.

Ignorance

Mansourkhani Roya and Sanchez Jr. Harry 

Ignorance 2
Ignorance 3
Ignorance 4
Unified Under Five

Mansourkhani Roya and Martinez Paola

The commence of this intriguing conversation began with an oil piece titled, “Wedding Preparations.” In this piece a young Muslim is preparing herself for her arranged marriage. The artist invites the viewer to place themselves into the lives of these women. Where the right to love whom you wish is taken away from you. You may no longer feel. You may no longer dwell on love or the opportunity to be happy. You may no longer love.

The response Roya Mansourkhani brought forth was in addition, a glimpse of the change Muslim women go through when they are married. They are now blinded to the rights they were given at birth and are forced to fall silent. Losing their opinion and their voice, women fall into a chain that has been carried through generations.

In agreement Paola Martinez observed the painting, and saw Strong Women. Women whom yes, may lose their voice, but fight generation through generation to survive. Almost like that of an animalistic instinct of a tiger fighting until the end. This instinctual survival is something that is passed from mother to daughter through generations.

Mansourkhani responded that if women would only use The Five Pillars of Islam to their favor they would become much stronger!

In agreement Martinez added four more hands to equal The Five Islamic Pillars, each as a strong individual and added them in unity to symbolize how united women are able to change and bring peace to the generational Line.

The conversation is ended with this piece, “Unified Under Five.”    

Hanging by a Thread

 

 Mansourkhani  Roya and Ramirez Jeanette 

When I began with this collaboration, my knowledge on the subject was limited. Working with what little I knew, my instinctive thoughts and feelings became the vehicle for my portion of the piece.The initial conversation with Roya Mansourkhani, started by me describing the Muslim women as mysterious and obscure. I portrayed these qualities by manipulating black fabric, where the finished product was a hanging body of fabric, frozen in movement and textures.Roya responded back by explaining how strong the male presence is in this culture, she talks about the restraints women have by adding a knot-like fabric to the work. Roya also shows the delicate presence Muslim women have in their culture, by casting her face that only shows nose, mouth and chin, she also casts her hand in representation of strength.I finalized the conversation by agreeing to the inevitable male presence for Muslim women, but yet I enhanced the strength of the Muslim women by representing her as the backbone. A strong entity that strives from injustice and continues on. I used the “insides” of the male subjects that Roya had constructed before as a fuller flowing body, giving it a wider aesthetic and stronger meaning of a Muslim women. One fabric in particular is thicker and longer from the others, representing the backbone. I added the knot-like fabric as a gruesome representation of the reality for Muslim women, a reality they’re trying to change day by day.

show thumbnails